Cider Braised Pork

Apple Cider Braised Pork

Earlier this month we drove up to Kenosha Pass for a bike ride through the trees. We were not alone-- the lot off of the Colorado Trail was packed even by 9 in the morning, a bustle of people, dogs, and babies getting ready for the trail. 

Apple Cider Braised Pork

Once we started up the trail the crowds thinned; on bikes we were able to get ahead of the walkers and wanders. After an initial thirty minutes of hill climbing, it was more than just the altitude taking our breath away: the vast aspen groves were golden yellow, sometimes red. The valley was washed in buckets of fall light, and the skies were a perfect lapis blue, dotted with fluffy clouds. 

"This is the part where you just want to die and go to heaven," my mom said. (At first I thought she might mean there is another big hill, i.e., You'll want to die trying to bike up this thing! but then I took in everything around me and thought, Yes, I could stay awhile.) 

At home, a slow cooker full of cider braised pork-- homey, slightly sweet, fall-apart tender- awaited our hungry post-ride stomachs. Honestly, at that point we were so hungry anything would've done the job but then and I thought: This is what September feels like.

Apple Cider Braised Pork
Apple Cider Braised Pork

Cider Braised Pork

Paleo, Gluten-Free, Grain-Free    |       |    Print This Recipe

Flavors of fall in a homey, slow cooker dish.

Serves: 4   |    Total Time:



Ingredients:

  • 1 pound pork shoulder, cubed
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1 onion
  • 2-3 stalks of celery
  • 2-3 large carrots
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 cup apple cider (hard cider or apple juice)
  • 2 cups bone broth
  • 2 springs each thyme and rosemary
  • Salt & Pepper

Directions:

  1. Heat coconut oil in the bottom of a pan or your Instant Pot. Place pork in pot, and brown on all sides. If you are browning meat in a separate pot, place the pork in your slow cooker/Instant Pot now.
  2. Mince garlic. Chop onion into wedges, slice carrots into rounds, and dice celery. Place all in the slow cook. Pour cider and broth in. Season with salt & pepper, and top with thyme & rosemary springs. Set slow cooker on low setting and cook for 10 hours (set Instant Pot to slow cooker setting).
  3. Optional: after stew is done cooking, spoon it into an oven-safe dish (such as a cast iron pot) and place under broiler for 5-10 minutes, to brown the top of the pork a bit more. Serve hot over sweet potato mash!

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Cumin Lime Shrimp

Cumin Lime Shrimp
Cumin Lime Shrimp

This blog has come a looooong way since it’s beginning days, when I would post just whatever we were eating that day. Cumin Lime Shrimp was one of the first recipes I posted, and was just that — what we were eating that day. Now, I make sure the recipes makes sense for someone to actually include in their life. Quick to make; delicious; thoughtfully curated. So, I needed to revisit this post.

The original called for a marinade. Marinades are GREAT but I rarely plan enough to make a full-day marinade work. Even remember to pull something from the freezer to thaw in the mornings is hit or miss. Maybe I had more patience back in 2016. Or maybe as I’ve grow older I’ve become more busy. Probably both. Either way, the result is a need for more quick meals, even when I plan meals ahead for the week.

Cumin Lime Shrimp
Cumin Lime Shrimp

SO, in the new version of this recipe, you simply do everything at once, and hallelujah, shrimp cook in just a few minutes so dinner is hot on the table faster than you can get through an episode of your favorite background Netflix show.

Because the shrimp do cook fast, I recommend prepping whatever else you plan on eating for that meal before you start on the shrimp — maybe warm some tortillas, and prep a slaw, and slice avocado for quick tacos. Maybe make a salad. Just do the shrimp last so that they’re warm when you go to eat.

Cumin Lime Shrimp

Published August 2, 2016 by
   Print This Recipe

Serves: 4   |    Active Time: 15 minutes



Ingredients:

  • 1/2 pound shrimp, raw deveined and shelled
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon paprika, ground
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin, ground
  • Pinch of salt
  • Dash of freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup lime juice
  • 1/4 cup cilantro, minced

  • Directions:

    1. In a bowl, combine shrimp, garlic, paprika, cumin, salt, and pepper. Toss to coat shrimp.
    2. Heat coconut oil over medium-high heat. Tilt pan to coat in oil.
    3. When oil is glistening, place shrimp in pan. Do not over crowd pan — work in batches if needed. Cook shrimp for 1 minute undisturbed on first side. When shrimp begin to turn pink, flip them to the second side and cook for 1 more minute. Move cooked shrimp to a bowl, and repeat until all shrimp are cooked.
    4. Pour lime juice into skillet, and use a wooden spatula to scrape and bits from the bottom of the pan. Place coked shrimp back in pan and stir.
    5. Sprinkle shrimp with cilantro and serve hot as desired.

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    Paleo Pumpkin Pie Pumpkins

    Paleo Pumpkin Pie Pumpkins

    Can we all just agree that it’s always time for pumpkin pie? That’s been the rule at my house for the last several weeks. My pumpkin pie consumption has been pretty shameless over the last few days, but it’s November so I’m considering it socially acceptable. 

    Paleo Pumpkin Pie Pumpkins

    Pumpkin pie for breakfast? Don’t mind if I do. My mom has always been known to eat pumpkin for breakfast for most of the month of November, so I guess it’s genetic. Besides, this pumpkin pie is crustless, full of freshly roasted pumpkin, farm-fresh eggs, and creamy coconut milk. So when I say, “Pumpkin pie for breakfast,” what I really mean is “Pumpkin pie for breakfast, as a post-workout carb, and maybe before bed too”. 

    Paleo Pumpkin Pie Pumpkins

    One of my friends just moved to the United States, and is experiencing pumpkin pie for the first time. And not just pumpkin pie, but the whole pumpkin pie flavored craze. She probably thinks it’s odd to eat pumpkin pie for breakfast, and it probably is, but while it’s November, I think we should all just make a pact and call it A-okay. Pumpkin pie, here I come! 

    Paleo Pumpkin Pie Pumpkins

    This particular pumpkin pie recipe feels extra festive to me. There’s something about taking whole pumpkins and turning them into your favorite treat that’s extra rewarding. Opening a can of pumpkin is fine, sure, but when you make the pumpkin puree yourself, you just feel good about it. It think it’s that feeling, more than anything else, that brings this dessert back to my table every fall. 

    Paleo Pumpkin Pie Pumpkins

    Paleo, Primal, Gluten-Free, Grain-Free    |       |    Print Friendly and PDF

    All of the pumpkinny goodness, with no distractions.

    Serves: 5   |    Total Time:



    Ingredients:

    • 3 cups pumpkin (2 sugar pumpkins
    • 1/2 cup canned coconut milk
    • 3 eggs
    • 1/2 cup honey
    • 5 teaspoons cinnamon
    • 1 teaspoon ginger
    • 1 teaspoon nutmeg
    • 1/2 teaspoon cloves

    Directions:

    1. Preheat over to 350°F. Prepare pumpkins: slice off the top inch of each pumpkin. Using a spoon or ice cream scoop, remove seed and pithy center. Discard (or roast!). Place Pumpkins on a baking sheet and bake for 40-45 minutes, until flesh is softened through. Remove from oven and allow to cool for 15 minutes.
    2. Once pumpkins are cool enough to handle, use a spoon to scoop flesh out. Be careful not to piece the skin of the pumpkin, as this will serve as your baking vessel. I leave a small amount of pumpkin still attached to the skin (1/4 inch) to help keep the pumpkin in a pumpkin shape. Place all of the scooped out flesh in a high-powered blender and puree (I have had friends try this with a regular blender and they’re had no success— go high powered!).
    3. Add eggs, coconut milk, spices and honey to blender. Blend until fully combined. Pour mixture back into pumpkins. Each pumpkin should be about 1/2 of the way full.
    4. Place pumpkins back in oven (on baking sheet) and bake for 40-45 more minutes, or until the pumpkin mixture is set (try jiggling the pan to check). Allow to cool 10 minutes before serving. Top with coconut cream, whipping cream, or greek yogurt.

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