Baked Oatmeal Apples

Baked Oatmeal Apples
Baked Oatmeal Apples

Breakfast already ready when you wake up. Seems like a dream, doesn’t it? But lately my approach to breakfast has been exactly that, batch making breakfast one or two times a week (things like casseroles, baked oatmeal, and frittatas) so that when I wake up there is one less thing to do as part of my routine. I usually do this on weekends, when there’s no rush to get out of the house.

Mornings are the best. (Who’s with me?) They are the best for a pretty specific reason (IMO), and that’s the peace and quiet they bring (morning lovers will understand).

That peace and quiet is largely possible due to routine for me. And it’s really hard to change something about your morning routine. I’ve tried adding in meditation (lasted about 14 days), journalling, and stretching, but none of them stick. What I usually find that adding more in just brings unnecessary stress during those early hours. When it comes to mornings, I’m all for simplifying.

Baked Oatmeal Apples
Baked Oatmeal Apples

Batch making breakfast fits perfectly into that scheme: as soon as I’m done making my morning coffee, I’m serving myself breakfast. No decisions necessary. No thinking. Just something absolutely delicious to eat. And in this specific case… something perfectly fall, too! Cozy apples filled to the brim with baked oatmeal and warm spices, like nutmeg, cloves, and cinnamon.

If you like cinnamon apples, or apple pie, but maybe don’t want quite that much sugar for breakfast, you’re going to love these apples. They’re not as a sweet as the “inside out apple crisp apple” recipes you may have tried, truly more like baked oatmeal stuffed inside of an apple, with the natural fruit juices leading the way in flavor.

That said…. with a little whipped cream they could make a cozy dessert later in the day.

My favorite types of apples are the crisp and juicy ones, and those are also the ones that work best in this recipe. Think Honey Crisp, Jonagold, or Granny Smith (that last one will be a big more tart, for those of you that love tart flavors). I used some Gala here.

Baked Oatmeal Apples
Baked Oatmeal Apples

Baked Oatmeal Apples

Published October 25, 2018 by
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Serves: 6   |    Active Time: 60 minutes



Ingredients:

  • 6 crisp apples
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted and cooled
  • 3 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup whole milk yogurt
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/16 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • Pinch of ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup chopped pecans
  • To serve: plain or vanilla yogurt

  • Directions:

    1. Preheat oven to 375°F.
    2. Using a paring knife, cut the tops off the apples and save for step 5. Using a spoon with sharper edges, such as a melon baller, scoop out the apple core and some of the flesh. Be sure the leave at least a 1/4-inch thick outer wall of apple all the way around. Reserve the flesh you’ve removed from the apples, discard of the seeds and pith.
    3. Chop up the reserved apple flesh and place in a medium mixing bowl, along with the melted butter, maple syrup, milk, yogurt, egg yolk, and vanilla. Stir to combine.
    4. Add the dry ingredients to the bowl: rolled oats, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, baking powder, salt, and chopped pecans. Stir until full combined.
    5. Arrange apples in a baking dish and scoop oat mixture into the cavity of each apple. Place the apple tops back on, and place baking dish on center wrack in oven. Bake 35-45 minutes, until apples are baked though.
    6. Allow to cool 5-10 minutes before serving. Serve on plates with yogurt (for breakfast) or whipped cream (for dessert).

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    Immune Boost Green Juice

    Immune Boost Green Juice

    I’m not much of a juicer. Never have been. I’ve always been a little down on what I see as a glorified consumption of sugar. That might sound a little harsh, and I admit that it is. But more often than not I’d rather drink a smoothie with all of its fiber, or just eat a piece of goddamn fruit.

    But, last week, there I was. I felt a tickle in my throat. Oliver had just finished reading me a news story about how the flu was out of control this year. And I decided I needed a boost. Green juice.

    Have you been there? The “please, please, please don’t let me get sick,“ feeling? That’s what this juice is for.

    Immune Boost Green Juice

    It is SUPER high in Vitamins C, A and K. Like nature’s Emergen-C! But, 100% natural.

    I drank that green juice down (and loved it, citrusy, with a touch of ginger). The next morning, The tickle at my throat was gone, but two days later Oliver complained of a sore throat too, so there I was again making green juice again--the same green juice I had made for myself just a few days before.

    Now, I’m still not that into juice. You'll find no recommendations on juice cleanses here. But this juice is like a multipurpose vitamin... like an insurance policy. You drink it with a wholesome breakfast and you get all those extra vitamin packed in.

    So far, I'm still flu free: maybe it had something to do with this juice, or maybe not. Either way, I fell in love with green juice somewhere along the way. At least this green juice. The insurance policy.

    Vitamin Boost Green Juice

    Immune Boost Green Juice

    Published February 8, 2018 by
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    Serves: 2   |    Total Time: 10 minutes



    Ingredients:

    • 2 leaves of dino (lacinato) kale
    • 1/2 cup sliced cucumber
    • 1 lemon, peel sliced off
    • 1 blood orange, peel sliced off 
    • 1 and 1/2 apple, cored and roughly chopped
    • 1 inch ginger
    • 1 cup water
    • 6 ice cubes, for serving 

    Directions:

    1. Place ingredients in a high powered blender: first the kale and then the cucumber, lemon and orange, apple, ginger, and water.
    2. Purée until smooth (I use a BlendTec (affiliate link!), and set the blender to the “Whole Juice” setting).
    3. Place a nut milk bag (affiliate link!) over a bowl or wide-mouthed jar, and pour purée through the nut milk bag to strain out the pulp.
    4. Optional: If you like, stir back in a tablespoon or two of the pulp.
    5. Divide ice cubes between serving glasses and pour juice over ice. Serve.

    Comment

    Parsnip & Apple Sauté

    Parsnip & Apple Sauté

    Parsnips have never been my favorite. I believe the first time I tried them I was already in my twenties, and their sweetness took me by surprise. I wanted desperately for them to taste a bit more savory, even when roasted. But there is something else I can't quite put my finger on when it comes to parsnips. Is it the Earthy tones? But I love beets, which even I admit can taste like dirt. I've heard parsnips described as "spiced," like nutmeg and cinnamon, but I can't say that's ever come to mind when I bit into one. Maybe that means my tastebuds just aren't quite on the parsnip game, but either way, there are still only a few ways I like to eat parsnips. 

    1. Cauliflower Parsnip Soup with Caramelized Onions and Apples (this is my favorite way to eat parsnips)

    2. Roasted like french fries (yes, it's true! 😳)

    3. This. Sautéd with apples and sage and eaten like a sweet-n-savory hash

    And I wouldn't even have known about the third one if it wasn't for a serendipitous day when I waked in the grocery store and there was a big table of samples from the deli. What were they serving? Latkes topped with parsnip apple sauté. And of course the latke was good (fried potatoes, duh), but I was also taken aback by how much I liked that parsnip apple sauté. And rather than trying to convince the clerk to give me five more free samples, I figured I'd come up with my own rendition.

    Parsnip & Apple Sauté
    Parsnip & Apple Sauté

    Really I'd say this is the sort of dish you might serve as a side at dinner, next to a roast chicken, or naturally, on a latke, but I ended up eating for breakfast a few days in row, polishing off the pan every time. It's a bit like a hash, but apples don't get the same sort of crisp as potatoes might, which is why I'm calling it a "sauté." And if you're thinking the parsnips and the apples make this dish sweet, you're right... but, minced garlic, onion, sage, black pepper and a pinch of salt also go into the pan, making it over all much more complex and truly a special combination. 

    Parsnips are also an ideal thing to make through out the winter. Did you know that they can be stored for six months after harvest and their flavors will remain just about the same? Apples, when stored properly, have a similar shelf life. So whether you're into eating seasonally or not, you can buy the ingredients for this dish basically throughout the entire year, and they'll still taste great. 

    Parsnip & Apple Sauté

    P.S. I am in love with this bowl. I happened upon it at TJ Maxx--it was the only one of it's kind- and have since found all sorts of ways to use it. I've never thought of sage as a blue color, but I love how this bowl echoes that colors of sage. 😍

    Parsnip & Apple Sauté

    Published January 11, 2018 by
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    Serves: 3   |    Total Time: 20 minutes



    Ingredients:

    • 4 medium parsnips
    • 1 medium apple
    • 1 medium sweet yellow onion 
    • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
    • 1 tablespoon coconut oil  
    • 1 tablespoon minced fresh sage
    • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
    • Salt to taste 

    Directions:

    1. Finely dice the onion. Then, peel and dice the parsnips into 1/2 inch cubes, and dice the apple removing the core (I leave the peel on the apple, but you may peel it if you prefer).
    2. Heat coconut oil in a medium-sized skillet over medium heat. When the oil glistens, add the onion and minced garlic to the pan, sautéing until the onion is transparent.
    3. Add the parsnips and apples to the pan, and stir. Sauté, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes, or until the edges begin to brown and the parsnips are tender.
    4. Mince the sage, and add it to the pan, along with the pepper and salt to taste. Cook for 2 more minutes, stirring occasionally, and then serve hot.

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