Potato Galette with Lox (AKA Giant Latke)

Potato Galette with Lox (AKA Giant Latke)

It's hard not to immediately fall in love with a dish that is crispy, fried potatoes topped with crème fraiche and lox. Virtually impossible, really. But with a fancy name like "Potato Galette" it would be easy to be scared off by this one, because it sounds hard to make. Which is why, after explaining this dish to several people as "a giant latke," I thought it should be included in the title. 

The word galette cues visions of beautifully free-form pies in my mind's eye, but according to wiki it's a lot less specific than that. Galettes are various types of flat round or freeform crusty cakes, and this crispy potato cake a perfect fit to that description. 

Call it whatever you want. In my book, crispy potatoes = winning, and lox for breakfast (or brinner) = winning, no matter what name you give it. 

Potato Galette with Lox (AKA Giant Latke)
Potato Galette with Lox (AKA Giant Latke)

I admit, the first time I made a potato galette I was nervous it wouldn't flip out of the pan. For one, I was making it for a party -- a potato themed party, thanks for asking - and didn't want to screw it up. But also, I used a cast iron pan while most recipes recommend a non-stick. I don't own any non-stick pans though (probably hard to believe when you see how full our cupboards are), so I made do with what I had. 

On that note, no matter the pan you use, please don't hold back on the oil/butter here, even though I know it's tempting. It's what makes the potatoes crispy, and will allow you to flip the galette out the pan in one fell swoop. 

Potato Galette with Lox (AKA Giant Latke)

Potato Galette with Lox

Published May 15, 2018 by
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Serves: 6-8   |    Total Time: 20 minutes



Ingredients:

    For the Lamb:
  • 2 Russet or Yukon Gold potatoes
  • 1/4 cup avocado oil or melted butter, divided
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper 
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 4 ounces lox
  • 1/4 cup creme fraiche, sour cream or plain greek yogurt
  • Optional, for serving: minced chives, capers

Directions:

  1. Wash potatoes, and peel. Then, shred (I use a food processor (affiliate link!) for this step).
  2. Heat 3 tablespoons oil or butter in a 10-inch cast iron skillet over medium heat until oil glistens. Tilt the skillet back and forth to cover the entire bottom.
  3. When the oil is hot, sprinkle have of the shredded potato into the pan. It should sizzle a little bit as it hits — if it does not, the oil is not hot enough yet. Ensure the potato is in an even layer, and sprinkle with half of the salt, pepper, and garlic powder. Using a metal spatula, press the potatoes down. Then, continue with the second half of the shredded potatoes, sprinkling them in an even layer. Top with remaining salt, pepper, and garlic powder. Again, press down with the spatula. Now, drizzle remaining 1 tablespoon melted butter or oil around the edge of the pan to help ensure it flips out easily.
  4. Cover pan with lid and turn heat down to medium-low. Cook for 10-13 minutes. Potatoes should be cooked through, and browning on the bottom. Now, use the metal spatula to loosen the potato galette from the pan, working your way around the edge and under the galette. Once the galette is loose, get a plate, and flip the galette over onto the plate so that it sites browned-side-up on the plate.
  5. To serve: slice into wedges, and top with a dollop of crème fraiche, minced chives, a slice of lox, and a few capers. Enjoy!

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Tilapia with Fried Capers and Lemon

Tilapia with Lemon and Fried Capers

I have been listening to a lot of podcasts: on my way to work, on my way home, even while I'm doing chores around the house or working out. 

While I'm driving to work, I love to listen to something that gets my brain working. This is when I pull out my -get-down-to-business podcast, Chopped. It's a podcast by food bloggers, for food bloggers, so I know not all of you will be interested in this one, but if you have a food blog, you should definitely tune in: 

Chopped. Even if you're just starting a blog, this one is worth subscribing to! I love getting little knowledge bombs from this show. Marly (the host) also keeps everything real and manageable. 

I have a hard time listening to podcasts while actually writing or crunching numbers, so I usually wait to continue my listening until my drive home. At that point I'm usually over trying hard for the day (11 hours is enough, time to sit back and relax. Seriously) and ready to just hear something neat or interesting. This is where Gastropod comes in. 

Tilapia with Lemon and Fried Capers

GastropodThis is not the first time I've brought up Gastropod, but what can I say? I love it. Dearly. If I had to pick one podcast and only one podcast to listen to, this might be it. Cynthia and Nicola are as nerdy as I am when it comes to food, and their podcast is really well produced. Gastropod covered topics like Counting Fish and how the type of silverware you're eating off of affects your meal. No matter the topic, you're sure to learn something new! 

Speaking of learning, I also just started listening to Wine for Normal People--I  started listening to it right after I wrote my post on Marsala wine, actually. Despite being a foodie, my wine knowledge is lacking. There's so much to know! So many names that are hard to pronounce! Years and blends and vineyards oh my! But when I go to buy a bottle of wine, I want to at least feel like I might be buying something I'll like. This podcast makes me feel like maybe I'll learn. One day. For now it's all just trial and error. Plus, this podcast is realistic, and lacks all snobbery you might think would come with a wine podcast. I also enjoy Stuff You Should Know for non-food related facts.

Tilapia with Lemon and Fried Capers

When I'm at home and working on something rather mindless, I usually want story with a bit more meat to it. Something that will entertain my mind while I bead, or take my thoughts far away while I clean. This is when I listen to shows like S-Town of This American Life. 

S-town. This podcast is especially recommended to those that enjoyed Serial, it's older cousin. It's intriguing, mysterious and sometimes a bit disturbing. Once you start listening, you just can't stop.

This American LifeBefore the era of podcasts, my parents would tune into This American Life on Colorado Public Radio. Maybe it's just a tradition for me now, but The American Life continue to be one of my favorite easy-listening podcasts. Their simple, everyday stories always carry a message that is deep and moving, though they tend to keep everything lighthearted. 

Alright, what podcasts do you subscribe to? What are your favorite and why? Lay it on me! 

Tilapia with Lemon and Fried Capers

Tilapia with Fried Capers and Lemon

Published May 2, 2017 by
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A easy tilapia recipe with bright lemon and capers.

Serves: 2   |    Total Time: 25 minutes



Ingredients:

  • 2 tilapia fillets
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 lemon, cut into wedges
  • 2 tablespoons capers
  • 2 tablespoons minced parsley

Directions:

  1. Using a towel, pat the fish dry on either side. Season with salt and pepper on both sides. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a skillet over medium heat. When it glistens, place the fish in the pan. Cook for 4-5 minutes on each slide, until fish is cooked through, opaque, and flakey.
  2. While the fish cooks, heat remaining 1/2 tablespoon of oil in a small pan. Pan capers dry with a towel (this will help minimize splattering). When the oil is hot (test it by flicking a drop of water into the pan—if it sizzles, it’s hot enough), pour the capers into the pan. Allow the capers to cook, stirring occasionally. After 3 minutes, remove from heat.
  3. Serve fish on plates, and squeeze 1 lemon wedge over each fillet. Sprinkle with capers and parsley. Serve with additional lemon wedges.

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Seared Tuna with Puttanesca Sauce

Seared Tuna with Puttanesca Sauce

Someone once told me that a cherry tomato has all of the flavor of a regular tomato, but packed into one tiny bite. They said that all tomatoes essentially have all of the same amount of flavor, no matter the size, which is why cherry and grape tomatoes are so sweet. I'm not sure if this is true--I don't even remember who told me this or where I was- but when you eat puttanesca sauce, you'll believe it. 

Seared Tuna with Puttanesca Sauce

As with most Italian sauces, this one starts with onions and garlic. They're sautéed until they're fragrant and your tummy rumbles, and then in goes a splash of wine, releasing floral aromas. Normally, this is where you'd add those plain-jane Roma tomatoes, canned tomatoes, or even some slicing tomatoes, diced up small. But here is where this sauce takes a delicious turn: swap in sliced cherry tomatoes and allow their natural sugars to caramelize in the pot along with the onions and wine. 

It's probably good enough to eat just like that, tomatoes, onions, and wine, but why stop at good-enough? Add a generous dose of herbs, salty capers, and Kalamata olives. 

Seared Tuna with Puttanesca Sauce

Seared Tuna with Puttanesca Sauce

Paleo, Gluten-Free, Grain-Free,    |       |    Print Friendly and PDF

Cherry tomatoes make this sauce unbelievably flavorful. Olives and capers accent the tuna.

Serves: 4   |    Total Time:



Ingredients:

  • 4 ahi tuna steaks
  • 2 teaspoons coconut oil
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes, sliced into halves
  • 1/2 red onion
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • Salt & pepper
  • Splash of dry red wine
  • 2 small fillets of anchovies (canned)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh basil, minced
  • Dash of cayenne OR pinch of red chili flakes
  • 2 tablespoons capers
  • 1/4 cup kalamata olives

Directions:

  1. Heat 1 teaspoon on coconut oil over medium heat in a sauce pan. Meanwhile, slice the onion into thin strips and mince the garlic. Add both to the pan once the oil is hot. Cook, stirring, until the onions are translucent and you begin to see brown bits.
  2. Add a splash of wine to the pan, and scrape the bottom to release any onion or garlic that may have stuck to the pan. Allow to simmer for 1 minute.
  3. Add the sliced tomatoes to the pan, and stir. Stir in the basil, red chili flakes/cayenne, minced anchovies, Kalamata olives and capers. Simmer for 5 more minutes until tomatoes have released their juices and the sauce begins to thicken. Season to taste with salt & pepper.
  4. Now, cook the tuna: heat remaining teaspoon of coconut oil in al are skillet over medium-high heat. Once the oil glistens, add the tuna fillets and sear on first side for 1-2 minutes (1 minute for rare, 2 for medium). Flip tuna, and cook on the second side for 1-2 minutes. Serve hot and spoon puttanesca sauce over top.

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