Brussels Sprout & Mushroom Stir Fry

Brussels Sprout & Mushroom Sesame Stir Fry

Part of me hates going to Costco: to lines, the people, the hustle and bustle. But part of me loves it: the fridge full of organic veggies when we get home, frozen wild fish fillets that I can cook into fish tacos all month long, and giant jars of peanut butter (always). 

Brussels sprouts and mushrooms are two things I almost never leave Costco without. As far as vegetables go, they stay good in the fridge for a while, and we always go through them all. Costco trips mean recipes like this: Brussels Sprouts and Mushroom Sesame Stir Fry.

Brussels Sprout & Mushroom Sesame Stir Fry
Brussels Sprout & Mushroom Sesame Stir Fry

Toasted sesame oil is one of my favorite condiments because it’s depth of flavor adds so much to any Asian-style dish! Along with a drizzle of soy sauce and a spoonful of maple syrup? That’s where the magic happens. It’s a sweet, savory, nutty combination that goes with just about anything.

I use shiitake mushrooms in this recipe because they work well in recipes that have Asian flavors (like soy and sesame). If you can’t find shiitake mushrooms, baby portobellos will work just fine!

After you’ve made this recipe with brussels sprouts, you might find that the sauce is extremely adaptable — you could do this same exact thing with broccoli or zucchini.

Brussels Sprout & Mushroom Sesame Stir Fry

Brussels Sprout & Mushroom Sesame Stir Fry

Published March 15, 2018 by
   |     Print This Recipe

Serves: 4   |    Total Time: 20 minutes



Ingredients:

  • 2 cups brussels sprouts, halved
  • 2 cups mushrooms, sliced (I used shiitake but cremini mushrooms also work well)
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil 
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce 
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
  • 1-2 tablespoon sesame seeds 

Directions:

  1. Heat oil in a wok or skillet over medium heat until it glistens. Add mushrooms and brussels sprouts to the pan, stirring briefly.
  2. Allow veggies to cook for 10 minutes, stirring ocassionally. Mushrooms should begin to soften and brussels should start to brown just on the edges. Add minced garlic to the pan, and cook for 3 more minutes, stirring every minute or so.
  3. Drizzle soy sauce, maple syrup, and sesame oil into pan and stir. Cook for 3 more minutes. Add sesame seeds to taste, and remove from heat. Serve hot!

2 Comments

Lemon & Garlic Brussels Sprout Breakfast Bowl

Lemon & Garlic Brussels Sprout Breakfast Bowl

It was noon on a Thursday. I escaped the confines of my chair and desk to stretch my legs and get a breath of fresh air, and explore Resource, our local upcycler where you may find someone’s discarded kitchen island or dining table or front door. I perused their supply of cabinets, but nothing stuck out at me, so not more than twenty minutes later I was on the road again.

A bus in front of me belched smog out into the air, which escaped into my window. It was warm for January, warm enough to have the window down. I breathed in the thick tainted air. Uggggh. 

Lemon & Garlic Brussels Sprout Breakfast Bowl

People everywhere, it struck me in that moment how my little home town has changed. It was never a small town, but the populations has grown by almost 30% since I was born. The actual size of Boulder is exactly the same, 25 square miles, but the number of people...that has changed.

We could’ve been anywhere in that moment—anywhere urban, that is. The city felt heavy with people and smog and stress in a way that made me feel sick to my stomach. 

You have to escape the stress of the city these days: The mountains are an escape; trails are an escape (as long as you pick the lesser known spots); even a mug of tea is an escape.

It makes me enjoy the freshness of produce, and simplicity of a fried egg more. Breakfast at home is a quiet moment before you have to face those lines of cars...the grind. Breakfast like this Lemon & Garlic Brussels Sprout Bowl is self-care. It's wholesome, nourishing my body, but it's also a moment of peace, filled with clean flavors and simple ingredients. Nothing complicated. Easy, like a breath of fresh air should be. 

Lemon & Garlic Brussels Sprout Breakfast Bowl
Lemon & Garlic Brussels Sprout Breakfast Bowl

Lemon & Garlic Brussels Sprout Breakfast Bowl

Published February 8, 2018 by
   |     Print This Recipe

Serves: 2   |    Total Time: 20 minutes



Ingredients:

  • 2 teaspoons coconut oil 
  • 1/2 yellow onion, diced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 10 brussels sprouts, shredded with a food processor or with a knife
  • 2 cups green kale, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest 
  • Salt & pepper 
  • 2 eggs 

Directions:

  1. Heat 1 teaspoon coconut oil in a 9-inch skillet over medium heat. When the oil glistens, add the onion to the pan and sauté until translucent.
  2. Add garlic to the pan, and sauté for 1 minute before adding the shredded brussels sprouts and chopped kale. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until the kale is bright green and soft, and the shredded brussels sprouts are tender.
  3. Add lemon zest to the pan, and stir to incorporate. Season to taste with salt & pepper.
  4. To cook the eggs, push the greens to the sides of the pan, making space for the eggs in the center. Heat the remaining 1 teaspoon coconut oil in the center of the pan. Once it glistens, crack the eggs into the center of the pan. Cook until the white is cooked through and the yolk is cooked to your liking (I like mine runny, but cook it a bit longer for a harder yolk).
  5. Serve hot with extra salt & pepper to taste.

Comment

Late Fall Salad

Late Fall Salad

I spent the last week experimenting a bit with what I ate. Driven by curiosity, I spent a week eating all of the traditional breads and grains. Months ago, I had wanted to see how my body reacted to eating wheat bread because, having chosen a more "paleo" diet out of lifestyle choice rather than because of any allergic reaction, I didn't really know what my body would do with it. 

So, I made fresh focaccia and smothered it with avocado, just to see what would happen. A headache ensued, and I figured the two were related. Still, results didn't seem conclusive, since a few weeks later when I tried again, seeking some sort of pattern in reaction, I got no headache at all. Which of course begged the question: was it the bread that caused the headache in the first place? 

I had to know. This last week I wrote down everything I ate, adding in some bread here and there. To be honest, I'm in such a habit of not eating grains that I had to make a real effort to buy bread rolls. I wrote down exactly how I felt afterwards, and tried to just generally listen to my body.

Have any of you done this before? A week-long experiment to see how you feel? It was harder than I thought it would be: Hard to change the way I eat, for one, but also hard to feel sure of yourself as you write anything down. I found myself doubting what I was feeling and what I wasn't. 

Late Fall Salad

Honestly the swirls of doubt muddied my conclusions. My journal would go like this: 

  • 1 piece of bakery bread toasted with goat cheese, steamed asparagus. Reaction: sharp headache. But I also think I drank too much coffee. 
  • 8 crackers, Cauliflower Parsnip Soup, Grass-Fed Sausage. Reaction: none. I did only eat 5 crackers though. 
  • Ciabatta roll with goat cheese, tomatoes with basil, balsamic reduction. An apple and a square of chocolate. Reaction: Pounding headache and brain fog. Am I just stressed?
  • And on. Every bullet clouded with a line of doubt. 
Late Fall Salad

How is anyone supposed to draw any conclusions when they are filled with this much conflicting information! So instead I am going to focus on what I know: 

  1. Eating a couple of crackers here and there (or, ehem, crust on pumpkin pie) will likely not make me feel horrible
  2. Eating a full piece of bread for breakfast might give me a headache, shorten my patience, and just generally cause inflammation. But since I'm not positive, I should continue listening to my body and feeling out what works and what doesn't. 
  3. My body knows best. I should listen to my body and try not to doubt it. I should also be open to what it's telling me, and maybe do something about all of that stress I noted, because that can't be good. 
  4. Sometimes you just need a big old bowl of veggies. And when that's what you need, you should make this salad. 
Late Fall Salad

Late Fall Salad

Primal, Gluten-Free, Grain-Free    |       |    Print This Recipe

So many of fall’s favorite flavors in one bowl!

Serves: 6   |    Total Time:



Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch dinosaur kale
  • 10 ounces arugula
  • Perils of 1 pomegranate
  • 1/4 pound brussels sprouts
  • 1/4 cup pepitas
  • 4 ounces soft goat cheese
  • 2 cups cubed butternut squash
  • 1 tablespoon avocado oil
  • Salt & Pepper
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • Balsamic vinaigrette

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Toss the cubed butternut squash in the avocado oil and spread out on a cookie sheet in a single layer. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, until squash is tender through and crispy on the edges. Remove from oven, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and set aside to cool.
  2. Remove stems from the kale and chop into bite-sized pieces. Place in the bottom of your salad bowl, and drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Using your hands, rug the oil into the kale to begin to soften the leaves.
  3. Add the arugula to the bowl and toss with the kale. Top mix of greens with crumbles of goat cheese, pomegranate perils, pepitas, and cooked butternut squash.
  4. Slice brussels sprouts into think slices, as if to shred them. Add to the salad.
  5. When ready to eat, drizzle salad with your favorite balsamic vinaigrette and toss.

Comment