Apple Cider + Honey Mustard

Homemade apple cider honey mustard

They would look at me in disbelief and ask again: "What do you want?" In a small voice, I would say, "Just a hot dog, no bun!"

They didn't know what to do with that. How do you even serve a hot dog at a hot dog stand with out a bun? Just wrap it in a napkin? And what about the condiments?! These questions were irrelevant to me -- I was happy just eating my hotdog with my fingers (I mean, you eat it with your fingers when it has a bun, right, so what's the difference?) and I wanted nothing to do with condiments. 

Homemade apple cider honey mustard

That was over 15 years ago. I was 5,or maybe 7 or maybe somewhere in between, and it happened all the time. I wanted just a dog, with none of the fixings, and no one could believe it. (I was the same way with burgers, but would take a slice of cheese on top if asked). Not much has changed; I still prefer my dogs undressed, and my burgers naked. 

Who invented the modern store-bought hot dog bun anyways? Maybe *maybe* if hot dog buns were more than just a floppy, soggy, smooth piece of white flavorless bread, I could've gotten on board. But, alas. The current state of hot dog buns is less than appealing and I was over it the minute I tried it. I've been eating my dogs bun-less since the 1990s and I'm not afraid to admit it! 

Homemade apple cider honey mustard

Only this has changed: my taste for condiments. I still despise ketchup (seriously, we have a bottle in the fridge that I refuse to touch), but other condiments I've warmed up to. 

Homemade apple cider honey mustard

Apple Cider + Honey Mustard

Paleo, Gluten-Free, Grain-Free    |       |    Print Friendly and PDF

Sweet and less acid that mustards made with plain vinegar, this mustard uses hard apple cider as a base.

Yields: 2 cups   |    Total Active Time:



Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup yellow mustard seeds
  • 1/4 cup brown mustard seeds
  • 1/2 cup hard apple cider, divided in half
  • 1/4 cup white balsamic vinegar
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 3 tablespoons honey

Directions:

  1. Pour mustard seeds, 1/4 cup of apple cider, white balsamic, and water in a jar and cover. Allow mustard to soak for 1 day.
  2. After a day, the yellow mustard seeds will have soaked up most of the liquid in the jar. Use a spatula to scrape the mixture out into the bowl of a food processor. Add honey to bowl, and then run food processor until yellow mustard seeds begin to puree, between 3 and 5 minutes. Scrape down the sides of the bowl as needed.
  3. Add remaining apple cider, 1 tablespoon at a time, to the food processor until desired consistency is reach. Pulse food processor between each addition. I used 2 tablespoons and ended up with a thick, spreadable mustard, but add more if you are looking for a thinner, dippable mustard.
  4. Scoop mustard into jar and tighten lid on. Store in fridge.
  5. NOTE: Homemade mustards have a much more pungent flavor than store bought varieties. The flavor will mellow out over time, but this homemade mustard is spicier than what you buy.